Georgetown & Volcanoville

History and Hiking

Learn the history, then hike through where it happened.

This post includes Georgetown and Volcanoville newspaper clippings from 1896 – 1958.

A trails list and links to additional reading and community resources are at the end.

Enjoy!

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Georgetown

Is the Georgetown Hotel Haunted? [FrightFind.com]

White-crowned sparrow | iNaturalist, user radrat
American Booklime | Photo credit iNaturalist, user LisaRedfern

Volcanoville

1896 Chico Weekly
California Sister | Photo credit: iNaturalist, user rawcomposition


1897 Oakdale Graphic

Convergent ladybeetles | Photo credit: iNaturalist, user scotwegner

1909 El Dorado Republican

1903 Marysville Evening Democrat

Emery Rock Tripe Lichen | Photo credit: iNaturalist, user LisaRedfern

Hiking Trails

Quarry Trail
This wide, level and easy, 5.6-mile trail connects Hwy. 49 to Poverty Bar. It follows the route of an old, Gold Rush-era flume – a man-made channel used to convey and harness the power of river water for hydraulic gold mining operations. Part of this trail was later used as the Mountain Quarries railroad, which transported limestone from the adjacent quarry. Elevations average approximately 700’ along the length of the trail.

Stagecoach Trail
Originally a stagecoach line built in 1852, this “moderate up, easy down,” 1.8-mile trail connects the Confluence to Russel Rd. and offers spectacular bird’s eye views of the Confluence Area and the American River canyon. From the Confluence, the Stagecoach Trail begins at an elevation of 567’, climbing to a maximum, ending elevation of 1,256’.

PG&E Road Trail
This “moderate-up, easy-down,” 1.3-mile trail offers spectacular views of the Middle Fork American River, as well as present and past limestone quarrying operations. This trail is best accessed from the Quarry Trail. There is no parking available at the upper end of the trail. Elevations range from approximately 700’ to 1,300’.

Olmstead Loop Trail
This easy to moderate, 8.8-mile loop parallels Hwy. 49 near the Town of Cool on one side and the American River Canyon on the other. It passes through rolling oak woodlands and includes canyon

More Local Links


Sierra Nevada Geotourism

Georgetown

Articles, Books & Blogs

Adventures in History – Trey & Monica Pitsenberger

Legends of America – Volcanoville

Miscellaneous

Mine Data – Josephine & Shields Mine

Georgetown Divide History Facebook Group

1958 Jeep Jamboree photos

Map of Georgetown Divide, El Dorado County showing portions of the Placerville and Forest Hill Divide with the ditches, mines, and other properties of the California Water Company.

University Falls YouTube Video

University Falls is 11 miles east of Georgetown, Ca. About a 3-mile hike down to the falls themselves, the last 30 – 400 yards is pretty steep with a rutted trail.

Publication researched and prepared by Lisa Redfern

Gold Rush Stories Book Review & Video Series

Gold Rush Stories; 49 Tales of Seekers, Scoundrels, Loss and luck by Gary Noy

“History, warts and all,” is the essence of what Gary Noy delivers. Noy’s meticulous research, ferreting through dusty archive boxes for photos and first-person accounts, makes his gritty, sometimes enormously disturbing, and often entertaining Gold Rush story vignettes radiate with life.

In the lawless immigrant melting pot of California dreams, “accidents, disease, murder, natural disasters, [and] mob violence, … took a heavy toll during the era. Some estimates indicate 20 percent of all forty-niners died within six months of reaching California,” Noy writes.

I had the pleasure of attending a lecture Noy delivered at a writer’s conference.

An introduction after the conference led to the creation of a series of videos featuring several stories from this book – https://followingdeercreek.wordpress.com/interviews/

From the extinction of California’s Grizzly Bear, environmental destruction, and racist atrocities to situations engendering multi-cultural cooperation, Noy links California’s haunting past to contemporary issues still playing out today.