Rough & Ready Cemetery – Filling in the Plot

Self-Guided Tour

Plan a visit between sunrise and sunset hours.


14474 Stagecoach Way
Rough & Ready, CA 95973


Select your preferred audio or visual media and travel back in time with a Randolph Flat family where you’ll learn about living with a handicap, problems with open mine shafts, women’s voting, love, and loss.

While visiting the cemetery, please demonstrate abundant respect for the Stagecoach Way neighbors, for those at eternal rest, and for their stone markers.

Download the single-page tour sheet PDF that includes GPS coordinates, a topographic map, and all tour links.

The podcast features period music and folk songs. (Same narration as the video.)

Soundcloud Podcast

Video includes
U.S. Census records, newspaper articles, and emotive video clips.
(Same narration as the podcast.)

YouTube video

“It was a perfect day to be out in person and in reverence for those hard working ancestors that came before us. The creative historical podcast was so interesting I had to watch the u-tube video.”

Mary Jo Curtin



Randolph Flat area
Images photographed from the big maps at the Searls Historical Library in Nevada City
https://nevadacountyhistory.org/searls-historical-library


Jenny Lind mining claim
Images photographed from the big maps at the Searls Historical Library in Nevada City
https://nevadacountyhistory.org/searls-historical-library

Bertha Cleveland mining claim
Images photographed from the big maps at the Searls Historical Library in Nevada City
https://nevadacountyhistory.org/searls-historical-library

Letter to Living Descentands:

Dear Clendenen and Cleveland descendants,

The self-guided tour media was produced by a genealogy volunteer for educational purposes only. All of the support documentation is available on Ancestry in a public tree named, “Filling in the Plot – RR Cemetery.”

While researching and pulling together public domain elements for this presentation, you were always in our thoughts.

There are so many relatable and engaging aspects of this story, it is sure to spark conversations and make Nevada County history even more memorable for its residents and visitors.

EXTRA

Create your own Cemetery Story (article) How-to Research in Three Steps (at bottom of page) – Full Circle Living and Dying

Links mentioned in the audio and video presentations:

 Jack London short story  –  PDF |  audio recording (YouTube).

Research Resources:

Find A Grave
Ancestry
Family Search
California Digital Newspaper Collection
Newspapers.com
The Grass Valley Daily Union archives
Doris Foley Library
Searls Historic Library

Referenced Nevada County Cemeteries 

St. Canice Cemetery
634 – 636 W. Broad St.
Nevada City, CA 95959

Pine Grove Cemetery
100500 – 18049 Red Dog Rd.
Nevada City, CA 95959

New Elm Cemetery
Kidder Street
Grass Valley, CA 95945

FullCircleLivingDyingCollective.com
http://followingdeercreek.com/

Free History Talk at the Rough and Ready Cemetery

Join me on March 26th at 1 p.m. for a free history talk where I will be presenting the story of the Clendenen and Cleveland family of Randoph Flat. 

The first members of this family traveled to California by overland trail. The last generation had radios at home and women who could vote.

Readings from the Grass Valley Morning Union and other newspapers will illustrate the happenings of their lives.

Click here for details and to sign-up.

 

Georgetown & Volcanoville

History and Hiking

Learn the history, then hike through where it happened.

This post includes Georgetown and Volcanoville newspaper clippings from 1896 – 1958.

A trails list and links to additional reading and community resources are at the end.

Enjoy!

iPad Users:
Save this
presentation
to your device!

Click here to download the interactive PDF.

Georgetown

Is the Georgetown Hotel Haunted? [FrightFind.com]

White-crowned sparrow | iNaturalist, user radrat
American Booklime | Photo credit iNaturalist, user LisaRedfern

Volcanoville

1896 Chico Weekly
California Sister | Photo credit: iNaturalist, user rawcomposition


1897 Oakdale Graphic

Convergent ladybeetles | Photo credit: iNaturalist, user scotwegner

1909 El Dorado Republican

1903 Marysville Evening Democrat

Emery Rock Tripe Lichen | Photo credit: iNaturalist, user LisaRedfern

Hiking Trails

Quarry Trail
This wide, level and easy, 5.6-mile trail connects Hwy. 49 to Poverty Bar. It follows the route of an old, Gold Rush-era flume – a man-made channel used to convey and harness the power of river water for hydraulic gold mining operations. Part of this trail was later used as the Mountain Quarries railroad, which transported limestone from the adjacent quarry. Elevations average approximately 700’ along the length of the trail.

Stagecoach Trail
Originally a stagecoach line built in 1852, this “moderate up, easy down,” 1.8-mile trail connects the Confluence to Russel Rd. and offers spectacular bird’s eye views of the Confluence Area and the American River canyon. From the Confluence, the Stagecoach Trail begins at an elevation of 567’, climbing to a maximum, ending elevation of 1,256’.

PG&E Road Trail
This “moderate-up, easy-down,” 1.3-mile trail offers spectacular views of the Middle Fork American River, as well as present and past limestone quarrying operations. This trail is best accessed from the Quarry Trail. There is no parking available at the upper end of the trail. Elevations range from approximately 700’ to 1,300’.

Olmstead Loop Trail
This easy to moderate, 8.8-mile loop parallels Hwy. 49 near the Town of Cool on one side and the American River Canyon on the other. It passes through rolling oak woodlands and includes canyon

More Local Links


Sierra Nevada Geotourism

Georgetown

Articles, Books & Blogs

Adventures in History – Trey & Monica Pitsenberger

Legends of America – Volcanoville

Miscellaneous

Mine Data – Josephine & Shields Mine

Georgetown Divide History Facebook Group

1958 Jeep Jamboree photos

Map of Georgetown Divide, El Dorado County showing portions of the Placerville and Forest Hill Divide with the ditches, mines, and other properties of the California Water Company.

University Falls YouTube Video

University Falls is 11 miles east of Georgetown, Ca. About a 3-mile hike down to the falls themselves, the last 30 – 400 yards is pretty steep with a rutted trail.

Publication researched and prepared by Lisa Redfern

Thank You, Black Artists!

National youth poet laureate Amanda Gorman reading her poem, “The Hill We Climb,” at the Presidential Inauguration dazzled, and Shonda Rhime’s Netflix series, Bridgerton took me to an alternate reality where I swooned and laughed.

These women grew hope for the year ahead and reminded me what ‘normal’ feels like. Sending heaps of gratitude – keep making more!

Wishing you a joyful Black History Month 2021!

More inspirational Amanda Gorman poetry and music by John Batiste who brings smiles and musical accompaniment to Stephen Colbert‘s monologues.

American Black History Study Resources

“If you don’t know better, you can’t teach better.” – Dr. Bettina Love | Sierra Writers Conference 2021 Keynote Talk

For Black History Month 2021, I’ve curated a YouTube playlist and additional study resources that have been helping to fill gaps left in my public school history education. 

Every video in it is associated with longer documentaries, films, podcasts, and/or books and audiobooks, as well as museums. The last video featuring Stanford Psychology Professor, Dr. Jennifer Eberhardt talks about what needs to be done to slow automatic bias within the brain.

Roughly organized along a historical timeline, the video collection includes the following topics; cotton and sugar industries, the New York Times 1619 project, early free Black communities, slavery, Reconstruction, The Lost Cause, lynching, policing, Civil Rights, Confederate statue removal, historic figures, and contemporary work on caste, racism, and implicit bias.

Additional Resources:

Biology: Race is a MythInterview with Alan Goodman, Hampshire Collge Biological Anthropology Professor & Co-editor of Genetic Nature / Culture: Anthropology and Science Beyond the Cultural Divide and Building a New Bio-Cultural Synthesis (PBS) | Video: Cautionary Notes on Using Biology to Infer Identity and Ancestry

There’s No Such Thing as Race (Newsweek 2014)

“Facts – The Civil War (U.S. National Park Service)” Nps.gov.

“What This Cruel War Was Over The meaning of the Confederate flag is best discerned in the words of those who bore it” The Atlantic. Coates, Ta-Nehisi 

Education, The Lost Cause & Monuments

Lost Cause of the Confederacy  – Wikipedia 

The ‘Lost Cause’ That Built Jim Crow“. New York Times. Gates Jr., Henry Louis (November 2019)

Make It Right (MIR) Project was a multimedia campaign from 2018 to 2020 dedicated to educating the public and strengthening the media capacity of the national movement to remove and replace Confederate monuments and memorials.

“The South’s Fight for White Supremacy” The New York Times. Meacham, Jon (August 2020)

“Texas Mother Teaches Textbook Company a Lesson on Accuracy” Nytimes.com. Fernandez, Manny; Hauser, Christine (October 2015)

Lesson Plans

Abolitionist Teaching Network

Facing History and Ourselves (Lesson Plans) – Facing History’s resources address racism, antisemitism, and prejudice at pivotal moments in history.

Pulitzer Center – The 1619 Project Curriculum 

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Racism Inserted into Popular Culture

The Birth of a Nation’ Shown” Washington Evening Star

“Romanticizing Confederate cause has no place onscreen” San Francisco Chronicle.  LaSalle, Mick (July 24, 2015)

“Regarding ‘Song of the South’ – The Film That Disney Doesn’t Want You to See.” IndieWire.com, Sergio (February 2016)

Vigilantism

“When Bigotry Paraded Through the Streets” The Atlantic. Rothman, Joshua (December 2016)

 

Recommended Theme Reads – Baby Stealing, Water Ecosystems & Houseboat History

Theme-based reading recommendations; unknown aspects of American history, water ecosystems, and houseboats.

Before We Were Yours by Lisa Wingate

Before We Were Yours accomplishes something I relish while reading for pleasure – it taught me something. The story is about a Tenessee baby stealing ring, Depression-era shantyboat culture, and institutional mistreatment of children.

For me, the most intriguing storyline follows a riverboat family from the ‘before’ time. Descriptions of nature knowledge gained while living on the Mississippi River are lush and sensory. It reminded me of the next book on this list.

The heartbreak, terror, and powerlessness suffered by poor birth families taken advantage of while at their most vulnerable and children separated from loving parents, and further – siblings from each other – was worthy of the strong emotions it stirred.

This book strengthened my convictions about the support needed for defenseless populations and about prosecuting those who value money over humanity.

A Secret History of American River People


Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

The “Marsh Girl” is an enigma in the backwater settlement closest to Catherine’s (aka Kya) home.

Abandoned by her mother, siblings, and eventually, by her abusive alcoholic father, the youngster navigates on her own through her teen and young adult years. She becomes an avid self-taught naturalist who delves into life the cycles of the animals and plants in her South Carolina marsh environment.

‘Fear of other’ and class bias causes her neglectful community to turn against her when the son of a prominent family is found dead.

Where the Crawdads Sing will delight natural history readers while highlighting the social and emotional damage caused by indifference and loneliness.

‘Where The Crawdads Sing’ Author Delia Owens Has A Strange Connection To A Real-Life Murder Mystery


Floating Point by Shelley Buck

Shelley Buck’s contemporary memoir gives the reader a viewpoint of life on a houseboat in the San Francisco Bay Area.

You’ll never look at a marina quite the same.

Shelley is a dot.com spouse with a high school-aged son attending a financially challenged charter school. While developing her author career, she seeks out a creative housing solution in uber-expensive Silicon Valley. Her journey takes the reader into a fluid dock community, repairs and maintenance unique to houseboats, and waterfront real estate under constant pressure from developers.

Buck’s canine-loving and nature appreciating observations intermingle with poetic narratives and moments of anxiety as she navigates through her soon-to-be empty nest and approaching retirement years.

If your reading mood calls for nature and water and you’ve got emotional reserves to explore traumatic children’s issues, Before We Were Yours and Where Crawdads Sing are great choices. If you want an uplifting family saga fraught with kids, pets, and mechanical challenges, Floating Point should hit the mark.

Best Wishes for Compelling Reading!

For ten more book recommendations from a historical fiction author/ reader, visit World of Mailman.

Hashtags

#microbooksummary #isolationreads #livingonthewater #quarantinereads  #currentbookread #currentlyreading #evironmentalreads #natureloverbooks #naturereads #naturebooks #ecology #wildlife #naturebookstagram #loneliness #comingofage #abandonment #humanconnection #selfreliance #animalobservation #selftaught #strongfemaleprotagonists #powerofhumankindness

Research Eating

In order to authentically write about a railroad worker camp cook, I had to cook and eat like one.

Below are links to resources I’ve experimented with to get the feel and flavors just right for the railroad camps.

click the image to link to the recipe

*click image for book link* This book was written by a descendent of a Chinese railroad worker. It includes family stories that were passed down through the generations.

Peggy’s Book Club Reads

Censorship & Politics

The Red Pony by John Steinbeck

 

Kristen: …one of those books you don’t appreciate when tasked with reading it in high school, but it takes on a whole new meaning when you read it as an adult.

Graphic Novel | Fantasy

Notes on a Case of Melancholia or A Little Death by Nicholas Gurewitch


Lisa:
The Grim Reaper’s child doesn’t want to follow in Dad’s footsteps. Listed as an NPR editor pick, this was a surprisingly charming story.

Graphic Novel | Native American | Folklore

Trickster: Native American Tales, A Graphic Collection by Matt Dembricki

Lisa: This book was on my bookshelf when I started reading Crossing the Owl’s Bridge by Kim Bateman. I attended a lecture of Dr. Bateman’s at a writers conference where she spoke about using the trickster and humor in writing. It was a perfect compliment to her book.

Grief & Loss

Crossing the Owl’s Bridge by Kim Bateman, PH.D.

Lisa: Through folklore, Dr. Bateman explores the grief process humans share across cultures and time. Contemporary grief client vignettes make this a timely read.

The love we have in a relationship doesn’t die with the body. It helps us heal.

I read this book as SARS-CoV-2 was breaking out. Bracing myself for difficult times ahead.

 

History

Sister Queens by Julia Fox

 

Mary: A true accounting of the lives of the daughters of Ferdinand and Isabella. Taken from their personal letters, court records and historical documents. An interesting perspective on somewhat unknown but important historical figures.

 

The Way I Heard It by Mike Rowe

 

 

 

 

Peggy: True, inspirational, funny stories. Easy read, great if you need short, interesting, individual stories. Seems like it would be a great book to give as a gift to anyone. I might buy a hard copy (got it from the library)just to pass around.

 

Historical Fiction

The Girl Who Came Home: A Novel of the Titanic by Hazel Gaynor

 

Lisa: Inspired by true events surrounding a group of fourteen women who were emigrating to America from Lahardane in County Mayo, Ireland. Eleven from the group died in the Titanic tragedy.

Of all the passengers, this group represents the largest loss from a single region. http://addergoogle-titanic.com/

Mystery

Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Windspear

 

Karen: Starts out around WWI time period and goes forward from there. Great details about young woman solving mysteries. There are fourteen books in this series!

 

Mystery | Detective

The Old Success by Martha Grimes

 

 

Mary read this book.

Nonfiction | Time Management

Do Nothing by Celeste Headlee

Lisa: Another timely topic – rethinking how we spend our time. Book Quotes: “In 1965 a Senate Subcommittee predicted that by the year 2000 Americans would work fourteen-hour work weeks. And take nearly two months of vacation time.

“Do not let corporate values determine how you spend your days and what your priorities are. You are a big-brained social animal currently constrained by unrealistic demands and expectations.”

Thriller

The Whistler by John Grisham

 

Kristen: Action-packed. Really enjoyed it!

Taking Guesswork out of Finding Good Books for 2019

For a reluctant, hold-your-breath-and-swallow type of shopper, the NPR Book Concierge gives me a reason to look forward to the holidays. It’s become my go-to place for every bibliophile on the Santa list.

Satisfied reading experiences bring good cheer well into the new year.

With the ability to filter titles by categories such as; Book Club, History Lovers, Thrillers, and Graphic Novels the site makes finding what you’re looking for easy. Book descriptions are concise, not more than a few sentences…and I enjoy reading them, often saving titles on other wish lists.

I do frequent the giant South American river online retailer, but I use Smile.Amazon.com to send a portion of the sale to a local nonprofit.

May this pointer make your holiday shopping more efficient and laser targeted.

Happy Gifting and Reading!

San Francisco Grave Removals 1930s – 1940s

The Gage family was one of many who were affected by grave removals in San Francisco.

With growing pressure to make efficient use of the valuable real estate, San Francisco’s dead had to make way for the living.

By the end of 1948, bodies in several pioneer cemeteries were moved to a mass grave site forty miles south in Colma, California.

Thousands of tombstones were recycled. Civic uses included; the sea wall at Yacht Harbor, breakwaters at the Aquatic Park and Marina Green, construction of a Wave Organ, as fill bedding for the Great Highway, as paving stones in the storm drains at Buena Vista Park and erosion control at Ocean Beach.

Phineas Gage’s niece, Delia Presby (Shattuck) Oliver’s gravestone appears on Ocean Beach when heavy storms move sand out to sea. It was last uncovered on June 4, 2012. The lettering — still legible — reads; Delia Presby, wife of, F.B. Oliver, Died, April 9, 1890, Aged 26 yrs., 10 mos. 27 days, — Rest –

aac-5185

Wave Organ in San Francisco - photo by Kārlis Dambrāns - https://www.flickr.com/photos/janitors/15174001514
Wave Organ in San Francisco – photo by
Kārlis Dambrāns – https://www.flickr.com/photos/janitors/15174001514

2022 Update & Personal Note: While researching a set of my previously unknown grandparents, I discovered that I also have family that was disinterred (from Oddfellows Cemetery) and moved to the mass grave in Colma.

Background Research:

Encyclopedia of San Francisco – Removal of San Francisco Cemeteries

1950 Location, regulation, and removal of Cemeteries in the City of San Francisco by William A. Proctor
Department of City Planning
City and County of San Francisco

oddfellows-1180x500

A Second Final Rest: The History of San Francisco’s Lost Cemeteries film by Trina Lopez

KQED Radio Program: Why are all of San Francisco’s Dead People Buried in Colma? | Transcript

History of Erosion on Ocean Beach by Bill McLaughlin Surfrider Foundation, San Francisco Chapter

Ocean Beach Headstones – Weird San Francisco History

122 Year-old Gravestone Washes Up on Ocean Beach

Find a Grave

Other San Francisco Cemetery Information:

Still Rooms Slide Show by Photographer Richard Barnes – Bodies found during the construction of San Francisco’s Legion of Honor

Additional Gage Resources

Lisa’s San Francisco History Research Sources on Pinterest

The San Francisco information above was gathered in preparation to write the novella Phases of Gage: After the Accident Years.